Second day at the new workplace, so far so good. 😥 (at Asia Pacific Digital)

Second day at the new workplace, so far so good. 😥 (at Asia Pacific Digital)

You Keep Using That Word... →

thedsgnblog:

Brogen Averill    |    http://brogenaverill.com

"The Writers Block is a promotional piece for writers at the Pond."

Brogen Averill Studio’s portfolio comprises major assignments for a “who’s who” of international brands as well as an enviable selection of niche design projects. Working with some of the world’s most successful companies and individuals, they have gained an international reputation, producing versatile and innovative design.

Returning from Europe to New Zealand in 2004, Brogen Averill Studio was established. The influence of European design culture and tradition has continued to inform their work, which is applied to a diverse range of mediums. They create concept lead design, investigating requirements and translating them into solutions that are intelligent, creatively inspiring and ultimately different.

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Hay Group Global R&D Team! As I begin a new phase of my professional journey, I unfortunately have to say goodbye to this group of wonderful people. In 2013 and fresh out of university, we met as colleagues, and after a year full of wildly inappropriate jokes, diabolically brilliant pranks and frank conversations of the kind they say colleagues should never indulge in, we part as friends. They made work feel less like work, a fact for which I will always be grateful :) (at Hay Group, One George Street)

Hay Group Global R&D Team! As I begin a new phase of my professional journey, I unfortunately have to say goodbye to this group of wonderful people. In 2013 and fresh out of university, we met as colleagues, and after a year full of wildly inappropriate jokes, diabolically brilliant pranks and frank conversations of the kind they say colleagues should never indulge in, we part as friends. They made work feel less like work, a fact for which I will always be grateful :) (at Hay Group, One George Street)

72% 드림카카오 초콜릿. For my colleagues, because chocolate. 😋 #becausechocolate #드림카카오 #chocolate #초콜릿 #롯데 #lastdayofwork (at Hay Group, One George Street)

72% 드림카카오 초콜릿. For my colleagues, because chocolate. 😋 #becausechocolate #드림카카오 #chocolate #초콜릿 #롯데 #lastdayofwork (at Hay Group, One George Street)

Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace. These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice.

President Nixon (July 20th, 1969)

- Alternative ”In Event of Moon Disaster” speech for if the Apollo 11 and its crew had been unable to return to Earth safely. 

Section 377A is inconsistent : PAP MP Hri Kumar →

A logical and well thought out argument is being made here.

jeremykaye:

jeremykaye:

Facts don’t lie.

I’m working on a two page strip for Wednesday right now, so I thought I’d dig an old favorite of mine out of my archive. :)
Facebook - Twitter - UP and OUT subreddit - Patreon

jeremykaye:

jeremykaye:

Facts don’t lie.

I’m working on a two page strip for Wednesday right now, so I thought I’d dig an old favorite of mine out of my archive. :)

Facebook - Twitter - UP and OUT subreddit - Patreon

Novels are fictions and therefore they tell lies, but through those lies every novelist attempts to tell the truth about the world.

pinkiedpurple:

More of this awesome children’s book here - Imgur

(via nortonism)

Audrey Hepburn lives! 

😏😒📖😶😕😮👍😃💖. 📖😶
#rereading #goodreads #davidogilvy (at Starbucks Coffee™ - Jurong Point 2)

😏😒📖😶😕😮👍😃💖. 📖😶
#rereading #goodreads #davidogilvy (at Starbucks Coffee™ - Jurong Point 2)

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read
To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.
These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my consciousness that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.
While there are loads of other great books on writing, I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”—the topics of these books are very diverse!
Reading Like A Writer  by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!
On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long time—like, 6 months or a year—and come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
Bird by Bird  by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
Elements of Style  by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a gift—for high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all about—gasp!—grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-y—I really want this illustrated copy!
If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritingbooks and I’ll reblog you! 

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read

To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.

These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my consciousness that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.

While there are loads of other great books on writing, I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”the topics of these books are very diverse!

  1. Reading Like A Writer  by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it!
  2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long timelike, 6 months or a yearand come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
  3. Bird by Bird  by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
  4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
  5. Elements of Style  by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a giftfor high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all aboutgasp!grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-yI really want this illustrated copy!

If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritingbooks and I’ll reblog you! 

(via wordpainting)